Rivets and Roses

Managing the Time

 

Last fall, I wrote a blog post about Handling It All and some tips that help me keep everything together. After that post, many of you have asked more in depth about how I structure my work days. I kind of struggled on how to approach this, because as many of you freelancers know, absolutely every day is different. Self-discipline and flexibility are the two biggest pillars in how I manage my time, while also learning to protect that precious time. And lets be real - managing our time better is something we can all be better at.

I try to balance as much personal time as I can with the full work days. I am slowly becoming a morning person and I try to clock out around 6 pm and leave work alone for the night (when I work, I am focused and when I'm done for the day it's all about my personal life). If I have weekends off - well those are entirely sacred. I also give myself a break. I am lucky enough to do what I love every single day, but that also means I could always be working. Sometimes I feel like I should be working all the time, which is something I am learning to let go of more and more. 

The most valuable thing we have is time. So no matter how you work your schedule, make sure the following things fit in:

Time with those you love.

Time spent doing what you love.

Time for yourself.

And time to enjoy it all. Otherwise, what is this hustle for? 

Below is an example of what a busy day looks like for me. On this particular day, we didn't have a photo shoot, but it was filled with many of the other things that go into our business. Hopefully it is a helpful example of how we structure our time. 

No matter how crazy or quiet your schedule may seem, keep focus and remind yourself why you do what you do. Try not to be consumed by the busy work - It is the quality, not the quantity of time that matters. 


9:00 a.m. - The meetings begin for the day. Meet Lucy. She's going to be one of our new assistants for 2017! Together with our Studio Manager, we met to go over the details and what to expect in joining our crew. 

11:00 a.m. - Melissa is an amazing part of our team and helps manage all of our Rivets and Roses photographers + clients, along with the studio. We just received some new look books for the Photogen Inc. weddings, so she's working on marketing those!

2:00 p.m. - Meeting at Spoon & Stable with Chef Gavin Kaysen for his upcoming cook book. I'm super excited to be a part of this project and it's great to be involved with such a collaborative team. The book is due out in 2018, and our meetings are filled with creative visions and planning out our shoots. 

4:00 p.m. - Had to swing by Young Joni, because I am a total professional and left my camera battery charging - derp. 

6:30 p.m. - One last meeting for the day, which is a consultation with a couple who is getting married in 2017! Lots of people just got engaged over the holidays, so these later meetings will be more common. 

5:30 a.m. - My days start early. This is a new thing for me - maybe a few months old. Nick and I realized that really the only time for us to workout is right away in the morning. So far, so great. We're not perfect at it, but it definitely feels amazing to get up and move early in the day. I do find I am more focused and productive with work right away in the morning, too!

10:00 a.m. - Precious studio time. It's amazing what we can get done in just a few hours. I usually sit down to go over payroll, e-mails, concepting, and backingup files from the previous day's shoots. 

1:45 p.m. - We love visitors to the studio, especially dogs! Today's visits are from Tulsi and Frankie. Jess, one of our Rivets photographers, dropped by to go over some edits and back up files! 

3:15 p.m. - Off to HAUS Salon to meet the crew for a shoot this weekend. We needed to scout the space, since we're bringing in a full studio set up. This should be an especially fun one! 

4:15 p.m. - Back to the studio to put in some editing hours. I'm super excited about our recent shoot with Young Joni and I love seeing the entire edit come to life. 

7:45 p.m. - Clocking out for the day! Today was jam-packed, but with all really good things. I also spent time on each of our brands, which is always a victory! Now it's time to go home and spend time with my favorite people. I'll also be asleep by 10 pm, guaranteed. 

Growth + New Brand Identity!

 

Identity work by dschwen

I am super excited to share the new identities of all of our companies! This is our eleventh year of business and as our work and businesses grow and become more refined, so do our brands. Last year, we took on the big project of updating all of our websites and this year brought along the next phase of that project, which was to unify all of the brands. We worked with the brilliant mind of David Schwen of Dschwen to bring the new identity all together and I am SO happy with how it turned out! Each company still has it's own individual presence, while still feeling cohesive with all we do here in the studio.  Lets break it down. 

 

The logos for ELIESA JOHNSON and ELIESA CONSULTS are very much the same. A lot of my consulting work comes from freelancers who are mostly connecting with these brands. The old logo use to feature my full signature, but we simplified it to how I actually sign my prints, which is with an 'e'. The new font is still simple, clean, professional and compliments the vibe of our imagery. We have a lot of ideas on how we are going to incorporate these logos in various design elements, printed materials and portfolios, so stay tuned! 

eliesaconsults.com

New social icon for eliesajohnson.com

 

The next brand I would love to share is Photogen Inc. This company is focused on luxury wedding photography and our clients have taken us around the world. Creating a logo that feels high end and still maintains a little bit of an edge was important to me. Our wedding clients are people who take risks, travel often and live a big life. I think this new logo is the perfect fit!

New social icon for Photogen Inc. 

New social icon for Photogen Inc. 

 

Last, but not least, is our Rivets and Roses brand. Rivets is the sister company to Photogen Inc. and is a wedding photography studio that features the work of 6 talented artists. The new branding for this company is probably the biggest change of all the brands! We entirely changed the look with a bolder, clean and more approachable font. It's friendlier and great for everything this brand stands for. It's also super strong and inviting. I am so very excited about this update!

New social icon for Rivets and Roses

I want to give a HUGE thank you to David and Jess and Dschwen for all of their hard work on this! We are in love with our new look and hope you are, too!

LOVEe

Welcome to ELIESA Consults!

 

Woo hoo!

I am so excited to finally launch ELIESA Consults! Business consulting for artists has been a part of my business for the past 7 years, but I never had a space for this to live until now. One of my business goals for 2015 was to unify all of our brands and create a home for our consulting clients + workshops. This new site offers information about both hourly and full day consultations, as well as speaking engagements

When I started mentoring  photographers in 2009 it seemed like a great idea for me to have this branded as a fluffy-feel-good company. Running your own business isn't all pretty, but it's also not all fear based. I grew out of this old branding quite quickly and realized that I had a lot more to offer and wanted to bring a real-life-perspective to those I mentored. I wanted to take it to the next level and create a serious consulting company. Over time, I started giving more speeches + talks to colleges and private organizations, contributing to magazine articles and having more hourly consultations - both in our studio and over skype. The last couple of years has brought along another shift. Our consulting clients have expanded from photographers to freelancers and small business owners alike in the creative world.  

Consulting has become one of my greatest passions. I feel that it is an honor to guide, mentor and teach our clients and these people equally empower and inspire me. If you are interested in a consultation, send me a note and we can get you all set up

Along with this new site, I will be starting to offer more workshops + learning opportunities. As we gather our ideas for these moving forward, I would love to hear what you are interested in learning about

Back in 2008, I was at a Brother Ali concert and he happened to say this quote that I have always drawn inspiration from. It was in that moment that I knew I had to teach others around me:

This Industry should not be a competition, but rather a collaboration. 

So here's to creating a positive community, filled with empowering one another to create successful businesses!

Why I started a wedding studio vs hiring associate photographers

I want to preface this post by noting that if you are not a photographer, this can also apply to you! Whether you are a designer, writer, or any type of freelance artist, I encourage you to think about the following points as is fitting for your business!

At a certain point in any photographer’s career, we start to think about hiring others to help us. Whether this means outsourcing editing, adding on assistants or signing up an intern – when business expands, so does our team around us. Today I want to talk about hiring on other photographers as Lead photographers…otherwise known as Associates versus creating a wedding studio. For the record, I really loathe the word ‘Associate’. Personally, I think it sounds like ‘second best’ and if I am going to hire anyone to be a lead photographer, they are not just going to be good-enough, they are going to be the best. However, for lack-of-a-better-term, I’ll use that phrase throughout.

Six years ago, my prices started reaching a more luxe price point for the Minneapolis market and I found myself turning away a ton of work. At the same time, I had a couple of assistants who were really starting to grow exponentially and were clearly on a trajectory to be amazing wedding photographers on their own. I decided to start another wedding studio, called Rivets and Roses, instead of having ‘Associates’ under Photogen Inc. I did this for several reasons, which I will get into later, but I first started the brand with one photographer and three years ago, we officially hired on five more artists to make Rivets and Roses an official wedding photography studio. I have to say, having a second brand, or really our sister company, has been nothing but a positive experience and I wanted to give some advice to those of you considering bringing on other photographers as Leads. Here are 5 things to consider when starting a wedding studio or hiring associate photographers:


 NUMBER ONE // Structure Your Business Right from the Beginning:

If you are going to hire on photographers to work for you, it’s important to think about how you want your business to be structured in the long run. If you take a long, hard look at this at the beginning of this journey, it will totally benefit you in the end, rather than having to restructure your business twice. Many photographers have associate shooters under the same company name and this works for them! However, when it came time for me to make this decision, I chose to start a completely different brand. Why? There are a few reasons:

  • What if it failed? I was a little nervous about the idea of having other photographers and it not going so well. What if it was too much? What if they did a bad job? I didn’t want that coming down on a company that I had worked so hard to build, so separating the two brands made sense to me.

 

  • I didn’t want our photographers to feel like they were second best. I felt like if they were shooting under Photogen Inc., clients might think of our artists as ‘the discount photographer’ or even ‘second best’ to myself. I wanted to give them more freedoms to be their own individual artists and thrive under a studio name, rather than my name.

 

  • I wanted to start a studio that was different from a general photography studio. I really do believe that brides and grooms should be able to find their perfect photographer, no matter their price point. I also feel like it is important that they get the top-of-the-line experience. Money is always a factor in clients decision making but when it comes to a wedding day, everyone deserves an amazing experience. The goal with Rivets and Roses is to provide an experience for both our artists and clients. For our couples, we want them to come to the website, browse thru our photographer’s portfolios and really choose the person that they connect with – both thru their images and personality – the most. Once their wedding has taken place, our studio continues to take care of all of the post processing, album design, etc. I have the highest of standards, and everything meets those requirements before it leaves the door! For our photographers, they are able to strengthen and grow their talents while being supported by our studio. It’s literally a win-win for everyone!

Now, with this said, there are many photographers who choose to have photographers under their name and it works perfectly for them! This has just been my experience. If this is something you are looking to doing, simply look at your business from all angles to see which model is right for you!

Image by  Ryan Stadler

Image by Ryan Stadler

NUMBER TWO // Build it Slow:

When I first started Rivets and Roses, I had only one photographer at a time. I am SO happy this is the way I chose to start this brand, because I learned SO much. Growing our sister company slowly has helped us build a fantastic reputation with the local Minneapolis market. Building this over a couple of years has also helped me solidify my visions for the brand and where I wanted to take it. There was a little ‘gut feeling’ I had a few years ago where I KNEW that it was time to take Rivets to the next level. I decided to ‘put it out there’ to hire on more photographers and make it an official wedding photography studio - and it was a little scary. I didn’t know what kind of people might apply or what people might think of me doing this, but I was blown away. We had SO many talented photographers apply to be a part of Rivets and Roses and I felt so humbled. This is also when I realized that this was going to be a big success. I am SO impressed with the quality of our team and just how amazingly they have come together to build up our brand and also create amazing work for their clients!

Image by  Maggie Witter

Image by Maggie Witter

NUMBER THREE // Empower Your Photographers:

This is so so so important. I am a pretty hands-off boss lady when it comes to our photographers. I’m here to structure things, guide them, critique their work and give advice…but I also want to empower them to be their own artists. I want them to have their own ideas and handle their clients in their own way. This approach is one of the key reasons why I think we have such an amazing crew. Each of our artists feel like they ‘own’ a part of this brand and every individual has so much to offer and bring to the table. Our photographers are in charge of answering their inquiries, setting up client meetings and being the leader on the day-of.  In other studio situations, clients are simply ‘placed’ with photographers and compensated on a per-hour basis. When I started Rivets and Roses, I wanted to make sure it was worth everyone’s while. Our photographers are compensated very well for their work and we sat down with each individual artist to make sure their rates made sense and also that their editing style can be processed by our editor, so their unique processing is true to each individual artist. If everyone feels like they have ownership in a dream, it’s going to soar. As the leader, I don’t want to overly-control too much. Passion is a strong, beautiful force that can take an idea and make it brilliant.

Image by  Jackson Faith

Image by Jackson Faith

NUMBER FOUR // Set Expectations:

Obviously, there needs to be structure in a business with 6 photographers under it. When we launched Rivets and Roses with more artists, we sat down and really nailed down our workflows to make sure that there were ‘routines’ in places. Every one of our artists follows the same workflow from start to finish. Of course, this also takes time to train in and get everyone on the same page. Some things to consider are:

  • Who books the clients?
  • How do you organize your inquiries? (I highly recommend Shoot Q!)
  • Who books your assistant for a wedding?
  • How much does the photographer get paid and when do they get paid?
  • How are the files managed?
  • What are the expectations in dealing with clients? (Literally– how do you answer the phone?)
  • After the photographer’s contract is done, do they get any of the images for their portfolios?
  • Who makes the contracts? Who’s in charge of the money?
  • What is the goal for both the artist and the studio?
  •  What are the specific roles of the artist and the studio?

Know that if you are starting a studio, you need to take the time to invest in your photographers, setting expectations for them and making everything clear. If you are clear in the beginning about everything – even the uncomfortable things like money, photo rights, terms of contracts, etc. this will save you a potential headache and heartache later on. Invest in a lawyer and make sure you have a solid contract. All of our photographers are contract for a minimum of 3 full wedding seasons and after that they are welcome to stay or some are ready to take the leap and go on their own…which leads me to….

Image by  Thea Volk

Image by Thea Volk

NUMBER FIVE// Be OK With Change:

Whenever you decide to hire people, whether that be a studio manager, editor, and assistant or another lead photographer, know this: people are always going to eventually leave. In my opinion, if I am doing my job right, eventually every one of my photographers will eventually be strong enough and prepared enough to be amazing on their own. With that said, there are certain personalities who are perfect for working for a studio and others who thrive to be on their own. Honor this. Honor the needs of your staff and understand that they need to go where their heart leads them. Artists always want more and we always strive to be better. Change in inevitable in business and as entrepreneurs, we need to be accepting, ready and able to deal with change in a positive way. Change moves us forward and helps us gain momentum for bigger and better things.

Image by  Melissa Hesse

Image by Melissa Hesse

To learn more about Rivets and Roses and our team of photographers, visit our website and blog!  If you are considering hiring more photographers under your brand, there is a lot to think about. My goal with this post is to encourage you and give some helpful tips on the ‘big’ things to think about! Hopefully this helped; however, if you have additional questions on running a studio, you can always reach out or schedule an official consultation to discuss the specifics of your business! Email me at: eliesa@eliesajohnson.com

You can also check out Rivets and Roses on Facebook.